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soldmysoletonike
09-26-2014, 09:53 AM
So I have a concern. I seem that I can't preform continuous reps for the deadlift, my form breaks to shit and I just can't keep going I gas. But I'm very good at 1-3 initial reps. When trying to put this into a DUP using the AMRAP method, would you suggest to maybe adding a fixed number to
My deadlifts every week and working with lower reps and more sets to get proper volume in? Or do you have another method. I can perform AMRAP easily with the bench and squat no problem I can rep and grind it out but I can't deadlifting

Also another side question, if I were to go into a more intensity block with let's say 86%,90%,92% would you do the AMRAP on the lower percentage days correct to make sure volume is still there?

chris_ottawa
09-26-2014, 09:09 PM
I have a similar issue myself, sometimes the bar rolls forward after a rep and throws off my setup. My solution is to reset and keep going, it just messes up my flow. These days I never deadlift for more than 5 reps anyway. I always reset after every rep anyway, getting into the habit of bouncing the bar off the floor will make you weak off the floor with heavier weights. If the problem is your form breaking down then look at failure as technical failure. Grinding out reps with terrible form is only going to engrain bad movement patterns and increase your risk of injury. Aside from repeating sets with the same reps, you could drop the weight for the next set and repeat the reps. Since you are on RTS, look at load drops and fatigue %. Also, I hear of some people deadlifting for singles only - obviously less volume but it works for some. And if you can't do multiple reps, why do AMRAP on a low %?

Troponin
09-27-2014, 07:49 AM
I'm sure most ppl on here are familiar with this video, but just in case:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-q3CTfHSBTg

Should give you some good ideas on how to program your deadlift. If you program with the SSPT table as your guideline, AMRAP sets are obviously not gonna be a part of your training.

chris_ottawa
09-27-2014, 09:19 PM
I'm sure most ppl on here are familiar with this video, but just in case:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-q3CTfHSBTg

Should give you some good ideas on how to program your deadlift. If you program with the SSPT table as your guideline, AMRAP sets are obviously not gonna be a part of your training.

That's the type of thing I was referring to. I understand the guy's logic, but I don't really agree that the stretch reflex always makes it easier for the next rep. I try to set up for every rep like it was the first one, including raising my hips and re-pressurizing myself. The only thing is that I keep my hands on the bar, but the second rep is never easier than the first. I record myself to check form sometimes and I noticed on some heavier sets (triples or doubles @9) I was taking around 15 seconds between reps, mostly because the bar wasn't where I wanted it to be. I thought I was taking too long, but maybe that isn't an issue.

I'm sure deadlifting for singles only can work, but my argument for reps is that you won't get the same training effect without the fatigue that accumulates by doing multiple reps in a set. I'm not sure what difference that would really make (any studies/research?) but every variable has an effect. To me, it seems that every rep gets harder and the last rep of a set @9-10 feels basically the same as a max-effort single. And if you are a powerlifter it is obviously useful to be able to grind out reps, but if you don't train with max or near-max weight regularly there won't be any grinding going on if you only do singles. From what I know, olympic lifters don't usually do more than 2-3 reps but there is no way you can grind out a clean and jerk or a snatch. I don't mean to discredit the SSPT table but I can see why it is possible that it isn't the best way to go.