• Using RTS on a Sheiko base program

      I talk quite a bit about long term planning because in my mind there are so many ways to do it right. As far as training goes, most of us understand that it is both art and science. We’re after producing effects for the athlete and that’s what matters. If you get good effects, then you did it right. If you don’t, then you did it wrong.
      There are usually good sets of rules and guidelines to go by when designing an individual training session or even a weekly template. But planning several weeks of training is more ambiguous. It’s difficult for lots of people to understand what’s going on or how to do it themselves.
      What I have suggested in the past is to take a Sheiko program and use it as a planning template. The reason is that usually Sheiko programs have good planning structures built in and you can use those to help you if you’re struggling to learn the planning process. It’s just important to note that if you decide to do this program, it’s no longer a Sheiko program. It’s a modification… a hybrid if you will.
      I’d love to tell you to expect great gains from this program, but the truth is that we simply don’t know what to expect right now. Usually, lifters on the original Sheiko program #37 (from which this is derived) do experience good results. And adding an RTS overlay should make it even more effective. However, if this program doesn’t address your fundamental needs, then it won’t work for you anyway. And what's more, the original Sheiko wouldn’t have worked for you either.

      Notes on the Fatigue Percents…
      Traditionally, RTS uses a load-drop style of fatigue percent. However, due to the nature of the Sheiko programs, this may not be appropriate. I think that it will stay more true to the original intent of the programming is a Rep-Drop style is used. Please see the article“Fatigue Percents Revisited” for more information on this topic.

      Who can expect results?
      If you use a Rep-Drop fatigue style with this kind of program, it is not as limited as it might appear at first. You should receive a variety of training effects. That said, the program does seem to be geared a little bit toward those lifters who are already good at grinding out weights. But even if you aren’t, chances are you’ll be fine with this program. And given the frequency and volume of work, it would be good for those who respond well to volume programming.
      I would not recommend this program for people who have low work capacities. The double sessions and high fatigue levels make the program difficult for even seasoned lifters. So if you know that you can’t handle high workloads, maybe you should pass on this one until you are in a little better shape. The good news is that Fatigue Percents will autoregulate the training volumes, so if you are on the fence as to whether your work capacity is high enough, then it probably is fine.

      The Program

      Week 1
      Monday
      Bench- x3 @8, 5% Fatigue
      Squat- x5 @8, 5% Fatigue
      Bench- x6 @8, 5% Fatigue
      Flies- x10 @7-8, 5 sets
      Good Mornings- x5 @7-8, 5 sets

      Wednesday
      Deadlift- x3 @8, 5% Fatigue
      Incline Bench- x4 @8, 5% Fatigue
      Dips- x5 @7-8, 5 sets
      Rack Pulls- x3 @8, 5% Fatigue
      Lunges- x5 @7-8, 5 sets
      Abs- x10 @8, 5 sets

      Friday
      Bench- x5 @9, 5% Fatigue
      Flies- x10 @7-8, 5 sets
      Squats- x3 @8, 5% Fatigue
      Tricep Extensions- x10 @7-8, 5 sets
      Seated GM’s- x5 @7-8, 5 sets

      Week 2
      Monday
      Squat- x2 @8, 5% Fatigue
      Bench- x2 @8, 5% Fatigue
      Flies- x10 @7-8, 5 sets
      Weighted Pushups- x10 @7-8, 5 sets
      Squat- x3 @8, 5% Fatigue
      Good Morning- x5 @7-8, 5 sets

      Wednesday
      Pause Deadlift (knee level)- x4 @8, 5% Fatigue
      Bench Press- x4 @8, 5% Fatigue
      Flies- x10 @7-8, 5 sets
      Deadlift- x3 @8, 5% Fatigue
      Lunges- x5 @7-8, 5 sets

      Friday
      Squat- x3 @8, 7% Fatigue
      Bench- x4 @8, 7% Fatigue
      Flies- x10 @7-8, 5 sets
      DB Extenstions- x10 @7-8, 5 sets
      Squat- x2 @7, 3% Fatigue
      Seated Good Mornings- x6 @7-8, 5 sets

      Week 3
      Monday
      Squat- x3 @9, 7% Fatigue
      Bench- x3 @9, 7% Fatigue
      Flies- x10 @7-8, 5 sets
      Weighted Pushups- x10 @7-8, 5 sets
      Squat- x5 @8, 5%
      Good Mornings- x5 @7-8, 5 sets

      Wednesday
      Pause Deadlift (knee level)- x4 @9, 5% Fatigue
      Bench- x4 @9, 5% Fatigue
      Flies- x10 @7-8, 5 sets
      Rack Pulls- x4 @9, 5% Fatigue
      Lunges- x5 @7-8, 5 sets

      Friday
      Bench- x2 @8, 5% Fatigue
      Squat- x4 @9, 7% Fatigue
      Bench- x6 @8, 5% Fatigue
      Flies- x10 @7-8, 5 sets
      Good Morning- x5 @7-8, 5 sets

      Week 4
      Monday
      Squat- x2 @9, 5% Fatigue
      Bench- x3 @9, 7% Fatigue
      Flies- x10 @7-8, 5 sets
      Dips- x8 @7-8, 5 sets
      Squat- x2 @8, 3% Fatigue
      Good Morning- x5 @7-8, 5 sets

      Wednesday
      Bench- x2 @9, 5% Fatigue
      Deadlift- x2 @9, 5% Fatigue
      Bench- x4 @8, 5% Fatigue
      Flies- x10 @7-8, 5 sets
      Lunges- x5 @7-8, 5 sets

      Friday
      Squat- x3 @9, 7% Fatigue
      Bench- x5 @8, 7% Fatigue
      Flies- x10 @7-8, 5 sets
      Dips- x7 @7-8, 5 sets
      Seated Good Mornings- x5 @7-8, 5 sets
      Abs- x10 @7-8, 3 sets

      Please keep in mind that this was based off of Sheiko program #37. If you would like to use this to train for a meet, the week after this (week 5) should contain 1-2 sessions of very light work (x3 @7, 0% Fatigue) for the contest lifts with the test itself being on the weekend. That said, #37 is a “Prep Cycle” and is intended to be followed by a “Comp Cycle,” which would be very similar to this with the following adjustments. It would have generally lower repetitions on the main lifts, RPE’s are likely to remain similar, and Fatigue Percents are likely to be reduced slightly. Remember that during week 3 of your Comp Cycle, you will want to do a Skills Eval (x1 @9, 0% Fatigue for each contest lift – all on the same day). Again, upon completion of the Comp Cycle, have an unloading week followed by a contest.
      Comments 4 Comments
      1. Pericu's Avatar
        Pericu -
        Hi Mike,

        I have a hard time understanding why we're supposed to use Rep-Drop instead of Load drop on the sets?
        1.st Squat day in #37 calls for 5x5@70%;
        - if we were to use x5@8 with 5% Load drop, wouldn't that leave us with about 70% with the reps of sheiko?

        For now we would end doing -1rep on each set. Maybe it's adding up over the sets, but I don't see the point in the rep drop yet. Maybe you could help me out.

        Furthermore, if it's intended to be a x3@8, 7% Repdrop, does that mean I continue with singles until I hit RPE 8?
        Due to RPE chart, reps less is 8%..

        Thanks in advance
      1. Mike Tuchscherer's Avatar
        Mike Tuchscherer -
        Doing a load drop will reduce your intensity by 5%. So either your top set is heavier than Sheiko recommends or your down sets are too light with a load drop. A Rep drop will keep the intensity the same. The reps change though, so that can cause issues as well. Now looking back on it, I think Repeats would be the most consistent option given his programming style.
      1. justinanderson's Avatar
        justinanderson -
        Hi Mike-
        Do you think one could overlay RTS on any/all Sheiko programs? I've run both the advanced small load (4x per week) and the intermediate large load (3x per week) in Sheiko. The latter I used through my meet on Sunday. I've had success with Sheiko, probably more than I should expect as a 47 year old, but it's also left me feeling really beat up at times. I almost never miss a prescribed lift, but some days a given weight/rep may feel like a 7 and others could feel like a 9-10. I have a feeling this may be part of the reason I am feeling beat up (aside from the reason that I'm an idiot who doesn't get enough sleep during the week). I think overlaying RTS may be what I need to reduce this feeling of being beat up.

        One other related question- since Sheiko never seems to deload, and generally runs in 4 week cycles (with the exception of the advanced competition cycles, which are 5 weeks), would you include a deload between cycles?

        Thanks!
      1. justinanderson's Avatar
        justinanderson -
        I feel pretty confident that I have this down, and will begin next week. But, I do have one question- I calculated all of the repeat to RPE based on fatigue percentages (using the standard RPE chart) and it looks like about half will repeat until an RPE of 10. The rest are 9 or 9.5 except for one each of 8 and 8.5. Obviously, this does not include the exercises that are 5 x 5 @7-8 RPE.

        It seems like a lot of work near failure. Am I crazy?

        Excel spreadsheet attached. Attachment 735


        Quote Originally Posted by Mike Tuchscherer View Post
        Doing a load drop will reduce your intensity by 5%. So either your top set is heavier than Sheiko recommends or your down sets are too light with a load drop. A Rep drop will keep the intensity the same. The reps change though, so that can cause issues as well. Now looking back on it, I think Repeats would be the most consistent option given his programming style.