Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 15

Thread: LPT-based programs (GymAware/Tendo) Repository

  1. #1

    LPT-based programs (GymAware/Tendo) Repository

    I just got an LPT device (GymAware) and was thinking it would be good to get everyone's personal experience using them.

    My plans are to use it as a tool to determine more objective RPEs.

    I did come across the following article "Effect of Different Pushing Speeds on Bench Press". Reading the cliff-notes it mentions stopping a set when there is a 20% drop off from the peak velocity of the set, this resulted in greater 1RM increase than the control group (sets to failure), whilst also accumulating less volume than the control group (?possible greater potential/room for future strength adaptation). Thoughts? (NB I haven't read the full article yet).

    Back on point, I'm thinking of correlating RPE/%1RM with either "Mean Velocity" (eg. 9RPE may equate to 0.3m/s) or "Mean Power" . Not sure which would be a greater indicator of overall fatigue/stress. Thoughts?

    Effect of Different Pushing Speeds on Bench Press.pdf

  2. #2
    Seems like a nice toy. How big is it? How difficult is the setup?

    If I understand Mike correctly he's of the opinion that speed work is not effective. With this tool it might be possible to better determine when your work is done. 20% speed reduction doesn't seem like a lot, I doubt it would be possible to gauge that using the RPE system.

    On the subject: should be 7's on mean velocity.

  3. #3
    Quote Originally Posted by uhagel View Post
    Seems like a nice toy. How big is it? How difficult is the setup?

    If I understand Mike correctly he's of the opinion that speed work is not effective. With this tool it might be possible to better determine when your work is done. 20% speed reduction doesn't seem like a lot, I doubt it would be possible to gauge that using the RPE system.

    On the subject: should be 7's on mean velocity.
    Tried it out today. Size of a box of cookies? Very easy to use. A bit of messing around but should be proficient within a week. Not really using it for speed work per se. Goal would be to gauge the end of a set by monitoring the mean velocity of the rep. Eg. For a certain individual a 9rpe for bench press may correlate to a rep mean velocity of 0.4, 10rpe maybe 0.3. It measures in real time (ie can determine the beginning and end of a rep).

    Pretty freaking cool if I can say so myself

  4. #4
    But you have to use a cord to attach to the bar right?

    Ok, now I understand what you mean with correlating speed to RPE. Very interesting, as they only compared speed in the investigation. So what you expect is just to make a better assumption of when you're properly fatigued compared to the RPE numbers?

  5. #5
    Check out this article serie if you're interested in velocity based train: http://complementarytraining.net/how...art-1-testing/

  6. #6
    I did the same thing -- I correlated RPE and velocity. I found that RPE is fairly predictable if you know your velocity at 1RM. So if you are particularly grindy on one lift, then the RPE-velocity correlation would be different.

    Anyway... here's the equation:
    RPE = ((Vmin/[V@1RM])-6)/(-0.5)
    Vmin is the velocity (average, not peak) of the slowest rep in the set. This is typically the last rep, but may not be.
    V@1RM is the velocity of a 1RM attempt in that lift.

    The most accurate way to get v@1RM is to do an actual 1RM and measure it. But you can estimate it too. Just do a set (or a few sets) and rate your subjective RPE.
    RPE = Subjective RPE
    Vmin = velocity of the slowest rep in the set
    V@1RM = Vmin / (RPE * -0.6 + 7.0333)
    Doing this more than once and taking a reasonable average would probably be better than a single trial. And the more accurate you can be with your RPE the better. So few reps, higher RPE is going to be more accurate than lower reps and lower RPE.

  7. #7
    Interesting find Mike.

    But do you still feel that training speed is not optimal in the bench? I think I read that in the manual anyways.

    How heavy could you go and still reach 3 m/s average speed? I just ask because thats the speed they looked a little closer at, might not be the most optimal speed.

  8. #8
    Quote Originally Posted by uhagel View Post
    Interesting find Mike.

    But do you still feel that training speed is not optimal in the bench? I think I read that in the manual anyways.
    Have you read?

    http://jtsstrength.com/articles/2013...k-doesnt-work/

    If not, you may find it to be of interest.

  9. #9
    Quote Originally Posted by Mike Tuchscherer View Post
    I did the same thing -- I correlated RPE and velocity. I found that RPE is fairly predictable if you know your velocity at 1RM. So if you are particularly grindy on one lift, then the RPE-velocity correlation would be different.

    Anyway... here's the equation:
    RPE = ((Vmin/[V@1RM])-6)/(-0.5)
    Vmin is the velocity (average, not peak) of the slowest rep in the set. This is typically the last rep, but may not be.
    V@1RM is the velocity of a 1RM attempt in that lift.

    The most accurate way to get v@1RM is to do an actual 1RM and measure it. But you can estimate it too. Just do a set (or a few sets) and rate your subjective RPE.
    RPE = Subjective RPE
    Vmin = velocity of the slowest rep in the set
    V@1RM = Vmin / (RPE * -0.6 + 7.0333)
    Doing this more than once and taking a reasonable average would probably be better than a single trial. And the more accurate you can be with your RPE the better. So few reps, higher RPE is going to be more accurate than lower reps and lower RPE.
    How did you arrive to the variables -0.6 + 7.0333?

    Anyway, did a spreadsheet for this to use in my training and see where my subjective RPE is compared to the correlation:
    https://docs.google.com/spreadsheets...it?usp=sharing

  10. #10
    Quote Originally Posted by uhagel View Post
    Interesting find Mike.

    But do you still feel that training speed is not optimal in the bench? I think I read that in the manual anyways.

    How heavy could you go and still reach 3 m/s average speed? I just ask because thats the speed they looked a little closer at, might not be the most optimal speed.
    Training at what speed? You can use a velocity measuring tool and still not be doing "speed work" in the sense of very-low-intensity acceleration training.


    FWIW, 3 m/s is impossibly fast for the powerlifts. For real. I don't even lift an empty bar that fast. Assuming you mean .3 m/s... that depends on the lift and on how many reps we're doing. But for me .3m/s is still very fast on the bench. It's solidly fast on the squat and deadlift. It varies based on velocity at 1RM.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •